The Calculus Story: A Mathematical Adventure

The Calculus Story: A Mathematical Adventure By David Acheson, Calculus is the key to much of modern science and engineering It is the mathematical method for the analysis of things that change, and since in the natural world we are surrounded by change, the development of calculus was a huge breakthrough in the history of mathematics But it is also something of a mathematical adventure, largely because of the way infinity enters atCalculus is the key to much of modern science and engineering It is the mathematical method for the analysis of things that change, and since in the natural world we are surrounded by change, the development of calculus was a huge breakthrough in the history of mathematics But it is also something of a mathematical adventure, largely because of the way infinity enters at virtually every twist and turnIn The Calculus Story, David Acheson presents a wide ranging picture of calculus and its applications, from ancient Greece right up to the present day Drawing on their original writings, he introduces the people who helped to build our understanding of calculus With a step by step treatment, he demonstrates how to start doing calculus, from the very beginning.. The Calculus Story A Mathematical Adventure Calculus is the key to much of modern science and engineering It is the mathematical method for the analysis of things that change and since in the natural world we are surrounded by change the deve

  • Title: The Calculus Story: A Mathematical Adventure
  • Author: David Acheson
  • ISBN: 9780198804543
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Calculus Story: A Mathematical Adventure”

    1. I found this book, simple and comprehensible, however, there was some part where I had to reread This book is about, how the calculus formed, And the story behind various calculus formulas.As I have a moderate understanding of calculus, so it was not very hard for me to relate to the material, but it could be for the person who s understanding of calculus is not that good.I Expected this book to be about the history of calculus, but sometimes it goes into equations only.However, it was very inf [...]

    2. An excellent book giving the reader an outline of the development of calculus and its relevance to the world around us Chapters are short, with simple explanations, so someone with relatively little mathematical knowledge but a willingness to concentrate a little, and sometimes reread, should be able to understand most of what is being said The style is attractive David Acheson successfully takes the reader into some quite advanced maths In the final chapters, if you are a non mathematician or n [...]

    3. I wish I understood of the details of the maths Aside from that, it was actually a pretty well written and exciting story, all things considered Calculus is cool

    4. According to the back cover This little book is ambitious than it looks Apart from a distinct feeling of damning with faint praise, there s an element of truth in this, which proves both a negative and a positive, depending on what you re looking for from a book on calculus.Let s get the negative out of the way first To make it a mathematical adventure, as the subtitle suggests, it would need rather story and rather less calculus Although David Acheson does get some history of maths in, this i [...]

    5. A great little read that brought back plenty of memories of Calculus classes I admit, this might have been easier to read in print, rather than on a Kindle, as the formulas appeared quite small, and the layout was all over the place Fun to get the brain reactivated after the holidays, and a great foundation for math and science exploration to come

    6. An ok attempt to make calculus easier to understand and to give it context in terms of the types of problems it and differential equations can solve The author starts well enough, but keeping the explanations clear to non mathematicians proves a difficulty I wanted to recommend it to my students, but I think it would frustrate them than enlighten.

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