Silt Road: The Story of a Lost River

Silt Road: The Story of a Lost River By Charles Rangeley-Wilson, At the foot of a chalk hill a stream rises in a silent copse, and is soon lost under the car parks and streets of the town its waters once gave life to Captivated by the fate of this forgotten stream Charles Rangeley Wilson sets out one winter s day to uncover its story.Distilled into the timeless passage of the river s flow, buried under the pavements that cover meadow,At the foot of a chalk hill a stream rises in a silent copse, and is soon lost under the car parks and streets of the town its waters once gave life to Captivated by the fate of this forgotten stream Charles Rangeley Wilson sets out one winter s day to uncover its story.Distilled into the timeless passage of the river s flow, buried under the pavements that cover meadow, marsh and hill he finds dreamers and visionaries, a chronicle of paradises lost or never found, men who shaped the land and its history the Jacobean maverick with an Arcadian irrigation dream, the sanitary inspector planning social emancipation, the libertine aristocrat who drew naked women in ornate lakes and flower beds In Silt Road miller s riot, chairmakers die of fever, men dream of fish.In this moving elegy to a disappearing natural world Charles Rangeley Wilson brings the history of the English landscape vividly to life.. Silt Road The Story of a Lost River At the foot of a chalk hill a stream rises in a silent copse and is soon lost under the car parks and streets of the town its waters once gave life to Captivated by the fate of this forgotten stream

  • Title: Silt Road: The Story of a Lost River
  • Author: Charles Rangeley-Wilson
  • ISBN: 9780701186432
  • Page: 331
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Silt Road: The Story of a Lost River”

    1. The River Wye has been hidden from view in High Wycombe, covered over in the sixties as the powers that be at the time thought it was unsavoury and full of rubbish Rangley Wilson wants to go back to the source of the river, and discover about the people that lived and worked on or near the river, and the reasons why it was covered up He travels to soggy fields in search of the springs that make the tributaries and to the sites of old mills, and spends a lot of time in council offices trying to f [...]

    2. A curious, eclectic and elliptical read that I struggled to really get into Hauntingly melancholic and cold it brings an almost Joycean slant to the history of High Wycombe and the forlorn, culverted river than runs beneath it and is the author s mission to excavate I found some of the tangents spun out from the river source to be gripping tributaries The nagging weight of what isn t there any that runs through the book made it hard for me to really enjoy this though I have a great deal of res [...]

    3. The lost rivers of London are mainstream now Topman have a t shirt range referencing them So what s a wistful psychogeographer to do How about the lost river of High Wycombe Yeah, you better believe it.

    4. This book came as quite a surprise to me, because although I knew it was about a lost river in a chalk landscape the blurb on the cover and the publisher s description of the book doesn t mention that it is about High Wycombe, which is where I grew up It was quite a shock to see the preliminary page with the old map and recognise my old home Almost all the locations and many of the stories were familiar to me, but the book contains much extra detail It s a work of psychogeography, so quite discu [...]

    5. A strange book, focussed on a stream, but often a stream of consciousness, leaving the reader feeling as if they ve actually read a series of articles rather than a cohesive narrative The writing feels very personal and is often florid or just simply superfluous too much detail on whether someone he passes is sneezing or what they are wearing, it doesn t really add anything All that said, I felt compelled to read on, to finish the book but I suspect was because I live only five miles away from [...]

    6. A fascinating exploration of the history of a river and the region it flows through, or did before being covered over in the name of progress There were a few points at which the author included cryptically personal events or concerns in a way that never really developed, lingering at least for me as a confusing distraction rather than a crucial part of the text, but I quickly got past those disruptions and back to the compelling weaving of travel writing and natural and cultural histories.

    7. In some ways I don t need to write a review, but simply say that Alison s review sums up my feelings exactly and in a better form than I can produce But I will add a few thoughts.This book was given to me as a present the buyer being attracted by the Robert MacFarlane quote on the cover There were lots of nice pieces of writing and a lot of interesting facts, but my problem was that I did not feel there was sufficient flow not intended as a pun to his discoveries he wandered up and down the stre [...]

    8. This story or obsession of following the history and trail of a lost river meanders and sometimes loses its way But passages of soothing lyrical prose and the sympathetic telling of how the history of the river has impacted on real lives overcomes this Good to know the author s final chapter was achieved as a result of independent research in the library having come up against the administrative indifference of the council planning department.

    9. Strange one this Moments of really beautiful writing but then other passages that just rambled and got nowhere Very weak when it came to dialogue with the people he met Much better with description and retelling old tales.

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